Bookmark and Share


The AIBS Education Award

LIGHTBOX EXAMPLE

Instituted in 2001, the AIBS Education Award is presented annually to individuals or groups who have made significant contributions to education in the biological sciences at any level of formal and informal education. The award is presented annually and consists of a plaque and lifetime membership in AIBS.

Recipients:

2012 Diane Ebert-May

Jo Handelsman

Diane Ebert-May
AIBS Education Award 2012

Diane Ebert-May is one of the foremost experts in the United States on teaching and learning in college biology. She was among the early advocates for innovation in undergraduate biology education and has argued strongly for a scientific approach to improving student learning outcomes. Ebert-May encourages her colleagues to "teach the way you conduct science, so that teaching and research become naturally integrated." She has helped faculty members across the nation introduce modern teaching methods into their courses.

Ebert-May is a professor of plant biology at Michigan State University, she presently serves as an associate editor for Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment and on the editorial board for Life Science Education, and she also maintains an active field-research program on tundra vegetation ecology. Ebert-May has served as the director of the Lyman Briggs School at Michigan State University and directed the Science and Mathematics Learning Center at Northern Arizona University. She has authored dozens of scholarly publications on science education or ecology and has been an active participant on national advisory committees.

Close

2010 Jo Handelsman

Jo Handelsman

Jo Handelsman
AIBS Education Award 2010

In 2010, AIBS honored Jo Handelsman, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor at Yale University's Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. Prior to joining Yale at the beginning of 2010, she spent 25 years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Her research is focused on the genetic and functional diversity of microorganisms in soil and insect gut communities, and she has contributed to the development of functional metagenomics, which facilitates the genomic analysis of assemblages of uncultured microorganisms through expression of their genes in a surrogate host.

In addition to her research program, Handelsman is nationally known for her efforts to improve science education and increase the participation of women and minorities in science at the university level.

Close

2009 Dr. Bruce Alberts

Dr.Bruce Alberts

Dr. Bruce Alberts
AIBS Education Award 2009

Dr. Bruce Alberts will receive the AIBS Education Award, presented to an individual (or group) who has made significant contributions to education in the biological sciences, at any level of formal or informal education. Alberts is currently editor-in-chief of the journal Science and is professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He served two six-year terms as the President of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and chaired the National Research Council. He continues to serve as an ex officio member of the National Academies Teacher Advisory Council, which he initiated.

Committed to improving science education, he helped initiate and develop City Science, a program that links UCSF to the improvement of science teaching in San Francisco elementary schools. Alberts was instrumental in developing landmark National Science Education standards that have been implemented in school systems nationwide. He also serves as the co-chair of the InterAcademy Council, a new organization governed by the presidents of 15 national academies of science and established to provide scientific advice to the world.

Widely recognized for his work in the fields of biochemistry and molecular biology, Alberts has earned many honors and awards, including 15 honorary degrees. Alberts is one of the original authors of The Molecular Biology of the Cell, considered the field's leading advanced textbook and used widely in U.S. colleges and universities. His most recent text, Essential Cell Biology, is intended to present this subject matter to a wider audience.

Close

2008 Eric Klopfer

Eric Klopfer

Eric Klopfer
AIBS Education Award 2008

At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Klopfer is the Scheller Career Development Professor of Science Education and Educational Technology and director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program (STEP). STEP prepares MIT undergraduates to become math and science teachers, and under Klopfer's leadership, the program has developed an extensive network of K-12 teachers to enhance its efforts.

His innovative research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. He cofounded Education Arcade, a group that is advancing the use of games as learning tools in the classroom. In recognition of his ideas and energy dedicated to transforming science education, Klopfer was elected to the Santa Fe Institute's Science Board, the recognized authority in New Mexico on K-12 education.

Close

2007 Carol A. Brewer

Carol A. Brewer

Carol A. Brewer
AIBS Education Award 2007

At the University of Montana, Brewer serves as the associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Her efforts to improve scientific literacy reach diverse audiences through projects that interconnect the general public, educators, and scientists.

Especially noteworthy in this regard is her work heading the educational initiatives of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). She encourages collaboration between scientists and educators, trains teachers to use their schoolyards for ecological investigations with students, and practices new assessment strategies to clearly connect teaching and learning.

Close

2006 Judy Scotchmoor

Judy Scotchmoor

Judy Scotchmoor
AIBS Education Award 2006

On 23 May, the AIBS Board of Directors and AIBS Awards Committee presented Judy Scotchmoor with the AIBS Education Award. The award is presented annually to individuals or groups who have made significant contributions to education in the biological sciences, at any level of formal and informal education.

After teaching middle school science for 25 years, Scotchmoor joined the staff at the University of California's Museum of Paleontology at Berkeley where she continues to educate people about the history of life on Earth. Her more recent initiatives include the website Understanding Evolution (http://evolution.berkeley.edu) and the Coalition for the Public Understanding of Science.

Close

2005 Deidre Labat and the Department of Biology at Xavier University

Deidre Labat and the Department of Biology at Xavier University

Deidre Labat and the Department of Biology at Xavier University
AIBS Education Award 2005

The 2005 Education Award went to Deidre Labat and the Department of Biology at Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans. The award was accepted by Michelle B. Boissiere, chair of the Department of Biology at Xavier University.

Presenting the award, Wake said, "Deidre Labat is vice president for academic affairs at Xavier University and led an extraordinary effort, while dean of arts and sciences, to enhance the academic success of African-American students. In 1996, Xavier (enrollment 2800) had 77 black graduating seniors accepted to medical school--more than Stanford, Duke, and Cornell combined. Even more remarkably, many students admitted to Xavier had standardized test scores that would have kept them from being admitted to many larger, more 'prestigious' universities. By focusing on students and finding ways to help them to success, Xavier University has succeeded where many others have failed."

Close

2004 John R. Jungck

John R. Jungck

John R. Jungck
AIBS Education Award 2004

The AIBS Education Award, presented annually to individuals or groups who have made significant contributions to education in the biological sciences, for 2004 goes to John R. Jungck, of Beloit College. John Jungck has specialized in science education for at least 20 years. He has published many constructive papers in American Biology Teacher, Biosystems, the Journal of College Science Teaching, and other science education journals; he has also made many contributions to other scientific journals.

Jungck's work in developing the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium represents another extensive contribution to biology education. As a 17-year-old reform effort, BioQUEST has sustained a community of innovative educators, providing them with a professional outlet for teaching scholarship that emphasizes the use of technology to support realistic problem solving and student-centered pedagogy. Indeed, as the 4 November 1994 issue of Science noted in its section on great teachers, Jungck is known as the "godfather of pedagogical software." The BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium has received two EDUCOM Higher Education Software Awards for "Distinguished Natural Sciences Curriculum Innovation." The consortium has also been chosen as a Project Kaleidoscope "model program" of science education that works.

Jungck has worked in biology and biology education not only in the United States but also in Australia, Thailand, New Zealand, Scotland, Egypt, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Hungary, Croatia, The Netherlands, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Canada, Peru, Ecuador, and the Ukraine.

Close

2003 M. Patricia Morse

M. Patricia Morse

M. Patricia Morse
AIBS Education Award 2003

The AIBS Education Award was presented to M. Patricia Morse, of the University of Washington. Morse is a marine biologist and science educator at the University of Washington. Morse holds a BS degree from Bates College, an MS and PhD from the University of New Hampshire, and an honorary DSc from Plymouth State College.

For 34 years, she was professor of biology at Northeastern University. The last four of those years were spent as a program director at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education as a specialist in biology and environmental science in instructional materials development.

She has published over 50 papers and 34 abstracts in molluscan biology and has published more recently in science education. Her work in functional morphology involves microscopic analysis (transmission and scanning electron and confocal microscopy) of the bivalve heart-kidney system as well as molluscan meiofaunal ecology and systematic studies.

Morse is a past president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, and the American Society of Zoologists (now the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology) and is a fellow of AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science). She is a member of the Board of Trustees at Bates College and is vice chair of the International Union of Biological Sciences' (IUBS) Commission for Biological Education. She recently served as chair of a National Research Council committee on "Attracting Science and Mathematics PhDs to K-12 Education" and as chair of the AIBS Education Committee.

She currently serves as project director for the Independent College Office on an NSF K-12 Partnership project and on the Advisory Group for the UW Sustaining Seattle Teachers Initiative.

Close

2002 John A. Moore

John A. Moore

John A. Moore
AIBS Education Award 2002

The winner of the 2002 AIBS Education Award is John A. Moore. Widely hailed as one of the nation's leading science educators, John A. Moore was a member of the Department of Biology at the University of California at Riverside, specializing in evolution, population genetics, and developmental biology of amphibians, until his retirement in 1982.

He received his PhD from Columbia University in 1944. Moore was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1963 in recognition of his early work in developmental biology; his seminal book, Heredity and Development; and his chairmanship of a number of National Research Council and National Academy of Sciences committees that focused on developing and strengthening undergraduate biology curriculum.

In 1958, Moore took a leadership role in the American Institute of Biological Sciences Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (now the independent BSCS, based in Colorado Springs) to develop high school biology textbooks. Books in this series, known to many as the "Blue Version," "Green Version," and "Yellow Version," are still in use. During the 1970s, Moore became involved in controversies about the teaching of evolution in schools and began to confront the rise of creationism as a "science" in the public's eye.

In the 1980s, Moore undertook a 7-year project, Science as a Way of Knowing, with the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology (then called the American Society of Zoologists). The seven volumes, printed in the American Zoologist, are collections of essays written by Moore and used in many biology undergraduate classrooms. Moore's most recent book, From Genesis to Genetics, was released by the University of California Press in January.

Close

2001 Rodger W. Bybee

Rodger W. Bybee

Rodger W. Bybee
AIBS Education Award 2001

New this year, the AIBS Education Award is presented to individuals or groups who have made significant contributions to education in the biological sciences--integrative and organismal biology, in particular--at any level of formal or informal education. Recipients receive a plaque and lifetime membership in AIBS.

The first recipient of the AIBS Education Award is Rodger W. Bybee, executive director of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS), a nonprofit organization in Colorado that is recognized for its development of inquiry-based science curricula and its leadership in science education.

Bybee has been active in education for more than 30 years. Before joining BSCS, Bybee was executive director of the National Research Council's Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education (CSMEE) in Washington, DC. From 1992 to 1995 Bybee served as associate director of BSCS in Colorado Springs, during which time he participated in the development of the National Science Education Standards; he chaired the content working group of that project from 1993 to 1995.

Moreover, Bybee was principal investigator at BSCS for four National Science Foundation programs addressing science and technology education at the elementary, middle, and high school levels and at the college level. From 1990 to 1992 he chaired the curriculum and instruction study panel for the National Center for Improving Science Education, and from 1972 to 1985 he was professor of education at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

Bybee has written extensively, publishing in the fields of both education and psychology. He is coauthor of a leading textbook, Teaching Secondary School Science: Strategies for Developing Scientific Literacy. His most recent book, published in 1997, is Achieving Scientific Literacy: From Purposes to Practices.

Over the years he has received numerous awards--Leader of American Education and an Outstanding Educator in America and Outstanding Science Educator of the Year (1979) among them--and in 1989 he was recognized as one of the 100 outstanding alumni in the history of the University of Northern Colorado. The National Science Teachers Association presented Bybee with the Distinguished Service to Science Education Award in April 1998. Bybee's biography has been included in the Golden Anniversary 50th edition of Who's Who in America.

Close

Click to see a full listing of AIBS Awards.

Bookmark and Share