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AIBS President's Citation Award

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Instituted in 1998, this award recognizes meritorious accomplishments by individuals or groups in the biological sciences. The award consists of a plaque and lifetime membership in AIBS.

2012 Marta Szigeti Bonifert

Marta Szigeti Bonifert

Marta Szigeti Bonifert
AIBS President's Citation Award 2012

Marta Szigeti Bonifert, Executive Director, Regional Environmental Center is tasked with building large scale cooperative programs between policymakers, the public, NGO's and business to address environmental issues across the EU. She was selected by 2012 President Susan Stafford for her exemplary work building these collaborations to advance science through complex and politicized environments. In accepting her award, Marta will share lessons learned that will impact how we as a community consider the opportunities and risks in developing collaborations to advance our own science on a national and international stage.

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2010 Mark A. McPeek

Mark A. McPeek

Mark A. McPeek
AIBS President's Citation Award 2010

The 2010 award recipient, Mark A. McPeek, is the David T. McLaughlin Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College. He is a native of Ashland, Kentucky, and received his BS and MS degrees from the University of Kentucky. He received his PhD from Michigan State University for research in community ecology and evolution at the Kellogg Biological Station.

In his research, he integrates empirical and theoretical studies of the ecological processes that structure biological communities and how those same ecological processes have shaped the adaptation and diversification of the groups that constitute these communities.

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2009 Michael Pollan

Michael Pollan

Michael Pollan
AIBS President's Citation Award 2009

Michael Pollan received the President's Citation Award for meritorious accomplishments by an individual (or group) in the biological sciences. In addition to being a prolific author, Pollan served for many years as executive editor of Harper's Magazine and is now the Knight Professor of Science and Environmental Journalism at UC Berkeley.

Pollan is the author, most recently, of In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto. His previous book, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006), was named one of the ten best books of 2006 by the New York Times and the Washington Post. It also won the California Book Award, the Northern California Book Award, the James Beard Award for best food writing, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He is also the author of The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World (2001); A Place of My Own (1997); and Second Nature (1991).

A contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, Pollan is the recipient of numerous journalistic awards, including the James Beard Award for best magazine series in 2003 and the Reuters-I.U.C.N. 2000 Global Award for Environmental Journalism. His articles have been anthologized in Best American Science Writing (2004); Best American Essays (1990 and 2003) and the Norton Book of Nature Writing.

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2008 Ira Flatow

Ira Flatow

Ira Flatow
AIBS President's Citation Award 2008

Ira Flatow received the President's Citation Award, which recognizes meritorious accomplishments by an individual (or group) in the biological sciences.

Flatow is a veteran science correspondent and award-winning TV journalist. For more than 35 years, he has been reporting and hosting lively, informative discussions on science, technology, health, space, and the environment.

Flatow currently hosts National Public Radio's Talk of the Nation: Science Friday. As a former NPR science correspondent, Flatow reported from Cape Canaveral, Three Mile Island, and the South Pole. His TV credits include six years as host and writer for the Public Broadcast System's Emmy-award-winning Newton's Apple, and science reporter for CBS This Morning and CNBC. He has talked science on Today, Charlie Rose, and Oprah.

He is the author of several books, most recently Present at the Future: From Evolution to Nanotechnology, and Candid and Controversial Conversations on Science and Nature.

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2007 Niles Eldredge

Niles Eldredge

Niles Eldredge
AIBS President's Citation Award 2007

Niles Eldredge received the 2007 President's Citation Award, which recognizes meritorious accomplishments by an individual (or group) in the biological sciences. Eldredge currently serves as curator in the Department of Invertebrates at the American Museum of Natural History and as an adjunct professor at the City University of New York.

He has made enormous contributions to making the general public aware of the central importance of evolution and biodiversity to all of modern biology. Most recently, Eldredge launched the journal Evolution: Education and Outreach, and he was the driving force behind the wildly successful Darwin exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History, which gave hundreds of thousands of visitors an in-depth understanding of the central role that evolutionary thinking plays in all of modern biology.

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2006 Mary E. Clutter

2005 Kenneth R. Miller

Kenneth R. Miller

Kenneth R. Miller
AIBS President's Citation Award 2005

The 2005 President's Citation Award was presented to Kenneth R. Miller of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. AIBS Past-President Joel Cracraft, of the American Museum of Natural History in New York, presented the award. Cracraft noted that "Kenneth R. Miller, professor of biology at Brown University, has distinguished himself in both science and education. He has been one of the most effective and tireless spokespersons countering intelligent-design creationism through his writings (especially his book, Finding Darwin's God), his lecturing, interviews in the media, and testimony before school boards and the courts. He has received numerous teaching awards from Brown University and has written a number of widely adopted biology textbooks at the high school and college levels."

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2004 Tyrone Hayes

Tyrone Hayes

Tyrone Hayes
AIBS President's Citation Award 2004

The AIBS President's Citation Award, which recognizes meritorious accomplishments by individuals or groups in the biological sciences, for 2004 goes to Tyrone Hayes, a dynamic young faculty member in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California-Berkeley.

Hayes is a distinguished teacher and mentor who is deeply committed to increasing diversity in academic, and his synthetic research is of the highest caliber, integrating endocrinology, development, and ecology to understand synergies and effects on organisms in nature, particularly frogs. His fieldwork is done in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the United States.

His recent research on endocrine disruptors, which has produced a potential test that has general application, has revealed major problems with various agricultural agents, including a widely used pesticide. His research entails large samples in double-blind studies; his work is carefully documented and rigorously analyzed--the science is impeccable. He has earned the approbation of many scientists and policymakers, yet because of the economic and policy implications of his research, Hayes has met with scientific and personal attacks.

With great personal courage, Hayes continues to expand his research into areas that are scientifically and politically important. He is a role model for a new generation of biologists who use basic research to look at major problems confronting humans and other species and their environments.

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2003 Hiram College AIBS Student Chapter

2000 Gary W. Barrett

1999 James T. Callahan

1998 Robert P. McIntosh

Robert P. McIntosh

Robert P. McIntosh
AIBS President's Citation Award 1998

Robert P. McIntosh, a Professor Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame, has dedicated his career, now spanning more than 50 years, to the study of ecology. His contributions are broad-ranging.

Through his research, he has helped define the science of ecology in a modern sense. Through his writing, he has added greatly to our understanding of the history of ecology. Concurrently, as editor of American Midland Naturalist, he has dedicated himself for much of his career to the science, craft, and business of the dissemination of scientific thought in the biological sciences as a whole. Although any one of these accomplishments might seem to be an adequate contribution, McIntosh also has stepped forward many times over the years to serve the organized societies of ecology and science when his unique insights and editorial skills were needed.

A look at his career is a tour that follows the maturation of ecology as a science. McIntosh, known to his friends as Mac, received his B.S. degree in 1942 from Lawrence College (now University) in Appleton, Wisconsin. He spent one summer during these early years collecting plants for Albert Fuller, Curator of Botany at the Milwaukee Public Museum. After military service from 1942 through 1945, he returned to Wisconsin and, aided by Fuller, became an instructor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1946. From there he headed to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for graduate work. This was a defining turn because his advisor at Madison was John T. Curtis in what came to be called the Plant Ecology Laboratory in the Department of Biology.

Under Curtis's direction and as one of his first graduate students McIntosh studied the phytosociological aspects of Wisconsin's upland forests. For his Master's degree, which was granted in 1948, he studied relic pine stands in Wisconsin's Driftless Area. His Ph.D. dissertation, finished in 1950, was a broader study of the Upland Hardwood forest of southern Wisconsin. In 1951, McIntosh published, with Curtis, the first of a series of papers defining the "vegetational continuum" concept, which incorporated H. A. Gleason's "individualistic concept" and substantiated it for the first time by employing a large body of data. That paper and those that followed changed the way in which ecologists look at plant communities. In them were conceptual and methodological breakthroughs in the study of terrestrial plant ecology. Until this time, Frederic Clements's concept of inflexible organismic association had dominated the interpretation of plant ecology.

During the next eight years of college teaching, first at Middlebury College in Vermont and then at Vassar College in New York, McIntosh studied the forest cover of the Catskill Mountains. He left Vassar in 1958 for the University of Notre Dame. There he continued his research and writing in forest community ecology and ecological theory, was named to the editorial board of Ecology, and became an associate editor of Ecological Monographs. Also during this time, he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

In 1970, McIntosh was named editor of American Midland Naturalist at Notre Dame, a position that he still holds today. Since its founding in 1909, Midland has published papers covering broad areas of natural history. During its early years, as its name suggests, Midland's intended geographic scope was the American midlands. However, within ten years of its inception it had become North American in scope. Today it holds a unique place in the body of natural history periodicals. It is a house organ for neither the University of Notre Dame nor for any learned society. It stands alone, true to its founding editor's original purpose, as a vehicle for the dissemination of biological literature. McIntosh is in his 29th year as editor-a remarkable tenure in an editorial position. He has now surpassed Midland's founding editor, Julius A. Nieuwland, C.S.c., who served as editor for 25 years.

McIntosh has continued to accept other committee and editorial responsibilities throughout his time with Midland. He was Program Director for Ecology at the National Science Foundation from 1977 through 1978. From 1982 to 1985 he served as secretary of the Ecological Society of America. In 1987 he relinquished teaching and research responsibilities at Notre Dame, becoming a Professor Emeritus.

He continues as editor of Midland and, if anything, has become even more prolific in his research and writing about the theory and history of ecology. His book, The Background of Ecology (Cambridge University Press, 1986), offers a unique perspective on the field-a field that he has helped to shape and, therefore, that he is eminently qualified to review.

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